How to Deal with Mosquito Borne Diseases As a Digital Nomad – Podcast 024

In this episode B and Jack talk about the risks of mosquito borne diseases for digital nomad. First, they explain the relevance of mosquito-borne diseases. Second, they talk about the main characteristics of the 6 common mosquito-borne diseases. Following that, they present a number of preventive measures you can take to avoid contracting mosquito-borne diseases. Finally, they discuss some additional things you should consider if you want to live in a place afflicted by mosquito-borne diseases for a longer period.

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The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. We are not doctors, thus you should always double-check the information provided here concerning mosquito-borne diseases with an expert.

1. Summary

1.1. The problem with mosquito borne diseases [2:26]

  • Mosquito borne diseases are illnesses transmitted by mosquitoes bites.
  • Mosquito borne diseases infect  700 million each year, resulting in over one million deaths.
  • Before the whole issue with Covid, perhaps this type of illness was one of the biggest health threats to digital nomads since as we will see, mosquito borne diseases are very prevalent in areas such as South East Asia (which is a digital nomad hub).

1.2. The topic of mosquito borne diseases within the Digital Nomad Life System [4:15]

  • The Digital Nomad Life System is a 6-step system created by us at Nomad Tactics that aims to explain how someone can go from living a non-nomadic normal life to living an optimized digital nomad life.
  • The fifth step of the system is called “Nomadic Living”. This is the broadest of all steps in the system. It basically can be understood as all the advice that would be relevant to a digital nomad when he is living in a base. This is of course very much context-sensitive depending on the specific situation of the digital nomad. You will encounter and try to prevent mosquito borne disease while you living in some locations as a digital nomad, thus we place this topic in this step.
  • To have a general overview of the Digital Nomad Life System you should listen to this episode.

1.3. An overview of mosquito borne diseases [5:38]

  • What are the main mosquito borne diseases you should worry about as a digital nomad?
    • Zika, Dengue, Malaria, Yellow Fever, Japanese Encephalitis and Chikungunya (yet keep in mind that many other mosquito borne diseases also exist)
  • How bad are mosquito borne diseases?
    • The severity and length of illness depend on the type of mosquito borne disease and can be different for each person. Infected people may or may not become sick. Some may have a mild, short-term illness, while others may have a severe or long-term illness (e.g. this happens sometimes with Japanese Encephalitis). Some mosquito borne diseases can be deadly (e.g. Malaria and Yellow Fever). Also, some mosquito borne diseases might be more problematic for specific demographics (Zika is a problem for pregnant women)
    • We will not list the specifics for each disease here. But you could read those on the CDC Travel website
  • What is the incubation (i.e. infection to onset of symptoms) period of such diseases?
    • Usually, for these diseases, the incubation ranges from 3 to 30 days.
    • More specifically:
      • Chikungunya: 3 to 7 days
      • Malaria: 7 to 30 days
      • Zika: 3–14 days
      • Japanese Encephalitis: 5 to 15 days
      • Yellow Fever: 3 to 6 days
  • Is there any treatment for mosquito borne diseases?
    • The majority of mosquito borne diseases have no specific treatment. Therefore, the drugs used are simply to alleviate the symptoms
    • One exception is Malaria, which has a treatment against it.
  • What are the symptoms of mosquito borne diseases?
    • The general symptoms of the majority of mosquito borne diseases that we listed are flu-like symptoms. This means things like fever, chills, headache, nausea, body aches, etc.
    • Nonetheless, there are more unique symptoms. For instance, severe eye pain (behind eyes) can be caused by dengue and conjunctivitis (red eyes) and rashes (often itchy) can happen in the case of Zika.
    • Since many of the symptoms for these diseases are somewhat similar, and also because of the fact that some areas around the world (e.g. South-East Asia) are afflicted by many of these mosquito borne diseases, then, as soon as you feel something, you should go to a hospital to test yourself and find out what specific disease might be the cause.
    • For a full list of possible symptoms go to the CDC Travel website.
  • Where are the risky places for mosquito borne diseases?
      • We could make a more or less accurate generalization by saying that mosquito borne diseases are usually found in more hot tropical regions such as South East Asia, Central America, South America, among other places.
      • Keep in mind that a disease occurring in a country is not such a binary matter as “disease X occurs” or “disease X doesn’t occur”. There are different levels of risk. A country might have a low, medium or high risk. The higher the risk the more preventive measures perhaps you should adopt.
      • The best way to check the mosquito borne diseases that are common in a country is by checking the CDC Travel website.

1.4. Prevention tips for mosquito borne diseases [11:52]

The more measures you take, the lower the likelihood of you contracting any of the diseases mentioned so far. But don’t aim for perfection necessarily, just try to implement the most measures you can.

  • Vaccines
    • Some of the mosquito borne diseases mentioned before have vaccines. For instance, there are widely available vaccines for Yellow Fever and Japanese Encephalitis
      • By the way, don’t forget to get the yellow booklet after you took the Yellow Fever vaccine in order to prove you got vaccinated. Some immigration officials require this document to allow you to come into the country.
    • There are some other less widely available vaccines, such as Malaria and Dengue. But these are not available in most countries. Also, usually, these vaccines are only available to very specific groups of people since these still are somewhat experimental.
    • We will give a better overview of the basic vaccines you should take as a digital nomad, as part of your Nomadic Life Prep, in a future episode.
  • Mosquito repellent
    • The mosquito repellent should be used every 5 or so hours to remain effective
    • The mosquito repellents should have one of these two substances in its formula in order to be the most effective
      • DEET (minimum 30%)
      • Picaridin
    • Do not put mosquito repellent near your eyes and mouth to avoid irritation
    • If you applying sunscreen, then first apply the sunscreen and the mosquito repellent should come afterwards
    • There is no need to put mosquito repellent under your clothes
  • Use the appropriate clothing
    • The clothes should minimize skin exposure (i.e. long sleeves shirt, pants, etc.)
    • The clothes should have a lose fit to prevent the mosquitoes from biting through it
    • The clothes should be light-coloured since it attracts fewer mosquitos
  • Accommodation
    • Look for accommodations that have an AC. Keep the AC on whenever possible in order to prevent mosquitos from coming around you. This is especially relevant when you go to sleep.
      • If the accommodation lacks an AC you can alternatively use a fan by placing it in a way in which the air will be blown directly into you
    • Check if the accommodation offers a bed mosquito net. Alternatively, you can bring your own.
    • Stop mosquitoes breeding in water pooling around your accommodation by emptying any water from containers around the place.
    • Look for accommodations that have insect screens on the windows. If the accommodation does not have those available then try to keep the windows closed.
  • Supports your immune system
    • Relevant supplementation to help the immune system
      • Zinc, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, Multivitamin
    • Maintain a good lifestyle
      • Enough sleep, water, balanced nutrition
  • Prophylactic Drugs
    • For some of these mosquito-borne diseases, you can use prophylactic drugs (i.e. drugs that decrease the likelihood  of you contracting the disease)
    • For instance, you can use prophylactic drugs for Malaria (which is one of the most serious diseases mentioned) such as doxycycline and chloroquine.
    • To acquire prophylactic drugs you should talk to a doctor in a travel clinic in your country. Alternatively, you can try to get these medications once you get to your destination (sometimes these are easily accessible in places with mosquito borne diseases).
    • Keep in mind that, for some of these drugs, you will need to start taking the medication some time before you get to the risky location, while you are there and also for some time after it.
  • Environment and time of the day
    • Try to avoid places with lot of vegetation and/or water (e.g. lakes and rivers) since these kinds of places tend to have more mosquitos around
    • Mind the time of the day you go out. The time from dusk until dawn tends to be the peak time for mosquitos
  • Protect your clothes
    • Mosquito repellent should be a basic preventative measure against mosquito-borne diseases, but, if you want to go a step further you can use the substance called Permitherin to also protect your clothes
    • What you need to do is to spray Permitherin in your clothes and let them dry before you wear them. This should repel mosquitoes from coming around you
    • Remember never to apply Permitherin into your skin

1.5. Consideration about living longer in a place afflicted by mosquito borne diseases [21:52]

  • Everyone can keep for some time most of the preventive measures listed before. If you do so then it is unlikely you will contract any mosquito borne diseases. Nonetheless, some of these prevention practices talked about might be hard to maintain for a longer period of time, such as when you decide to live in a country for a couple of months. This is because some of the practises might be taxing in your body long term (e.g. prophylactic drugs) and/or because it might simply be too annoying to keep doing all of those things for a long period of time.
  • Thus, you should assume that if you decide to live for longer in a place afflicted by mosquito borne diseases then you won’t be so diligent in taking so many preventive measures all the time. In such a case it makes sense to consider some additional things before deciding to relocate to a place where there are mosquito borne diseases. Those things to consider are:
  • Consider your health
    • Pose yourself the following questions:
      • Do you have a health underlying condition?
      • Are you pregnant, intending to be pregnant or breastfeeding?
    • If you answered “yes” to any of such questions then perhaps it is better to avoid going for an area that has mosquito borne diseases to live there for too long. The risks might be too great for you.
  • Consider the compromises you will need to make
    • Are you ok making compromises in the name of safety?
    • Even if you do not follow all the preventative measures listed before, you will still need to follow, at least some of them, in order to be safe. If you ok making compromises (in terms of following preventive measures) then should be fine for you to relocate to a location with mosquito borne diseases. Otherwise, rethink relocating there.
  • Consider how risk-averse are you
    • Are you ok with the possibility of contracting a mosquito-borne disease, even if the risk is small?
    • If you are very much risk-averse then perhaps it is not a great idea to move to a place with mosquito borne diseases. The longer you stay in such places the higher it is your chances of eventually contracting a disease.
  • Consider the time of the year in which you intend to live there
    • There are some periods of the year that are more prone to mosquitos. For instance, you could avoid going to the location in the Summer or during the rainy season since these tend to be the times of the year that are full of mosquitos
  • Consider which type of area you will live in when you are in the country
    • The more urban areas usually are less afflicted by mosquito borne diseases. On the contrary, countryside areas usually are more affected by these diseases (due to the environment). Perhaps consider staying in the former kind of setting rather than the latter.
  • Be attentive to symptoms
    • For most diseases, the earlier you detect it, the better it will be in terms of the treatment (if there is a treatment available for that disease of course). Be attentive to possible symptoms and if you think you got a disease go to a hospital to get tested.
  • Monitor the current epidemiological situation of the region you thinking about relocating
    • As we established before the risk of mosquito borne disease in a country is not a black and white matter. It is definitely something that should be understood in terms of “degrees” of risk. Thus, independent of the “baseline” (e.g. low, medium, high) risk of the country for a specific disease, check if there are any major outbreaks happening at that moment. The best way to check the current epidemiological situation of a place is to Google the name of the country together with the name of the different diseases relevant to that country. Once you do that use the Google News function to see the recent news. If there is a major outbreak you should obviously avoid it for now.
  • Make sure you have health insurance
    • Make sure to buy health insurance before getting to this new risky location. In case you contract any of these mosquito borne diseases (or you have any other health problem) then you won’t need to worry about the spending related to it.
  • Consider the medical facilities of the place
    • Check if the city in which you intend to live has the minimum required health-related facilities in case you need it due to contracting the mosquito borne disease.

2. Transcript

Mr. B: Hey hello guys just before starting the actual episode I would like to issue a quick disclaimer.
Mr. B: So today we're gonna talk about mosquito borne diseases but I would like to say that all the information on this episode is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice diagnosis or treatment so you should always double check the information that we are about to provide about mosquito borne diseases with your doctor.
Mr. B: I hope you find this episode useful.
Mr. B: Hey hello.
Mr. B: Welcome to the Nomad Tactics podcast.
Mr. B: Here we provide a complete how to guide for digital nomads.
Mr. B: I'm your host B. and I'm joined by the co host Jack.
Mr. B: Today we gonna talk about everything you need to know as a digital nomad about mosquito borne diseases.
Mr. B: I will start with a quick summary of the episode.
Mr. B: First me Jack gonna talk about which problem exactly we're trying to tackle in this episode.
Mr. B: After that we gonna place the topic of mosquito borne diseases within the digital nomad life system.
Mr. B: Following that we going to provide an overview about mosquito borne diseases.
Mr. B: Than we gonna talk about some prevention tips you could follow as a digital nomad to avoid diseases transmitted by mosquitoes.
Mr. B: And finally we gonna talk about some considerations that you should make as a digital nomad if you intend to live longer in a place that is afflicted by mosquito borne disease I hope you enjoy the episode.
Jack: So hello Mister B..
Mr. B: Hello Jack.
Jack: So today we will be talking about mosquito borne diseases and as obvious as it sounds mosquito borne diseases are illness transmitted by mosquito bites.
Mr. B: Sure that's right and I mean the motivation for this episode is that a very good friend of ours got malaria a couple of years ago which is of course the mosquito borne disease so he was living in Vietnam at the time and he had this really horrible experience after he told us about his whole experience I did quite a bit research on the topic of mosquito borne diseases more specifically how to prevent those.
Mr. B: And by the way just a quick thing I would like to say in the beginning of the episode is that the intent of this episode is not to scare anyone off about traveling to certain locations rather the tension of this episode is to make people better informed thus allowing you as a digital nomad to travel to such locations in a safer way.
Jack: Yeah mosquito borne diseases effects of a hundred million people each year resulting in over one million deaths so for most places the risk of contracting of mosquito borne diseases not high but none the less it is important to be aware of such risks.
Mr. B: Yeah that is very much true and I would say that before this Covid perhaps one of the biggest health threats to digital nomads were indeed mosquito borne diseases.
Jack: Yes so to summarize the goal of this episode trying to raise awareness of mosquito borne disease as well as outlined some actionable steps you can take to try to avoid those so I think as usual we should go to our digital nomad life system digital nomad life system is a six step system that aims to explain how someone can go from living in non nomadic lifestyle into a living an optimized digital nomad life so Mr B. where would put this topic into which step of the system?
Mr. B: So I think the topic of mosquito borne diseases could be placed on the fifth step of the system and this fifth step is called the nomadic living. Nomadic living is the broadest of all steps in our system and it can be basically understood as all the advice that would be relevant to a digital nomad when he's leaving in a base I E. whatever city he's living at that moment.
Mr. B: This is of course very much context sensitive depending on the specific situation of the specific digital nomad and of course the reason why we place the topic of mosquito borne diseases in this specific step is because you will encounter and you will try to prevent mosquito borne diseases while you are living in certain locations as a digital nomad anyway to have a general overview of what we call the digital nomad life system you could listen to episode number two.
Jack: Yes so let's going to the main topic we should give a overview about mosquito born diseases so Mr B. what are the main mosquito borne diseases you should worry about as a digital nomad?
Mr. B: So I would say that there are six main ones and these are zika dengue malaria yellow fever Japanese encephalitis and chikungunya so perhaps these are the six main ones but of course there are many others in this specific episode we just gonna refer to these six since they are perhaps the most prevalent once.
Jack: I see so how bad are mosquito borne diseases.
Mr. B: So this depends a lot the severity and the length of the illness will depend on the specific mosquito borne disease and it will differ quite drastically from person to person so infected people may or may not become sick some may have a very mild disease or a disease that is very short term while others might have a very severe or long term disease so for instance Japanese encephalitis might have bad long term consequences for you and finally some mosquito borne diseases can be deadly like malaria and yellow fever and one last observation about how bad mosquito borne diseases is that sometimes they are very problematic to a specific group of people so for instance zika is a disease that for quote unquote normal people is not such a big deal but if you're pregnant you might have a lot of problems with the newborn.
Mr. B: In this episode we will not talk about all the specifics of each of these diseases but we strongly advise people to go to the CDC travel website and read about how bad each of these diseases can be in order for you to be informed.
Jack: I see so what are the incubation periods of such diseases.
Mr. B: So the incubation period basically means how long it takes for the onset of the symptoms and for mosquito borne diseases the window is quite big so it can range from three to thirty days at least if we are considering this six diseases that we mentioned before so for example if we look to a disease like yellow fever usually appears in three to six days the symptoms I mean but if we look to a disease like malaria it can take from seven to thirty two days.
Jack: And what are the treatments for mosquito borne diseases?
Mr. B: So the majority of diseases mention have no specific treatments and that's partly why you should be careful with those.
Mr. B: The medication you might take will simply alleviate the symptoms one exception of course is malaria which has a treatment against it I'm not exactly sure how effective it is but at least there's something you can do if you catch it.
Jack: So what are the symptoms of such diseases.
Mr. B: So of course eight we were very slightly but generally this mosquito borne diseases have very much flu like symptoms this means things like fever headaches nausea body aches stuff that you would expect if you got a flu.
Mr. B: As I said some of the diseases mentioned have some very unique symptoms so for example dengue might cause you a very severe eye pain Zeca might give you a conjunctivitis which basically means your eyes become red.
Mr. B: And also it might appear on the infected person some rashes that are very itchy
Mr. B: Once again the full list of symptoms can be seen in the CDC travel website.
Mr. B: Finally one last thing that I would like to say is that since many of the symptoms of these diseases are somewhat similar.
Mr. B: As soon as you get any symptoms we advise you to go to a hospital in order to test which exactly disease you have Than they will be able to advise you what course of action you should take.
Jack: I see so where are the the risky places for these diseases?
Mr. B: We could make a more or less accurate generalization here by saying that mosquito borne diseases are usually found in this more hot tropical regions such as Southeast Asia Central America even South America.
Mr. B: Of course they appear in other places as well but you know if you want the rule of thumb think hot tropical weather but one important thing to keep in mind is that you should not see this type of disease as a binary matter what I mean by that is that you should not simply think as country Y has disease X. it's better to understand the mosquito borne diseases in terms of degree of risks so what country might have a low risk, medium risk or high risk and of course the higher the risk of the country or the region the more preventive measures you should probably take in order to avoid getting a mosquito borne disease once again the best way to check for risky locations is to go to the CDC travel website.
Jack: I see so that's going to the next topic prevention tips for mosquito borne diseases then of course the more measures you take the lower the likelihood of you contracting any of these diseases
Jack: But don't aim for perfection just do as much as you can so the first measure is vaccines.
Mr. B: Yes so some mosquito borne disease already have vaccines against for instance
Mr. B: Yellow fever in Japanese encephalitis are two diseases that have widely available vaccines there are some other vaccines such as malaria and dengue which are much less available and sometimes they use if those are restricted to some countries or to certain groups of people and these are somewhat experimental vaccines so perhaps a lot of people would not be very comfortable taking it right now the topic of travel vaccination is a very big topic and we surely gonna have future episode specifically talk about that since the topic of vaccination is one of the key actions you should do within the first step of our digital nomad life system the first app is called the nomadic life prep.
Jack: Yes so the second measures is mosquito repellents.
Mr. B: So together with vaccines I would say this is one of the key measures to prevent mosquito diseases.
Mr. B: So mosquito repellents is this a liquid you can apply to your skin in order to avoid being bitten and just some key tips related to mosquito repellents are the following number one you should re apply mosquito repellent every five hours or so.
Mr. B: In order to keep the protection up another important thing is that whenever you're buying a mosquito repellent you should look at the formula and see if it has one of the two ingredients DEET with a concentration at the very minimum of thirty percent or picaridin.
Mr. B: The reason why these two ingredients are so important is because based on clinical trials if you use any of these two ingredients the mosquito repellents will be the most effective other tips to keep in mind is that if you are applying sunscreen together with the mosquito repellent you should always first apply the sunscreen and the muscular repellent afterwards also do not put the mosquito repellent near your eyes and mouth especially if he used a mosquito repellent with a formulation with DEET or a picaridin since it is a very strong substances it gonna deeply irritate the area.
Mr. B: and one last thing is that you don't need to apply the mosquito repellent underneath your clothes since the clothes themselves going to be the natural protection.
Jack: So the next measure is choose right cloth to wear.
Mr. B: So now we're talking about which kind of clothes you should wear in order to try to prevent mosquito bites the first thing to consider here is that you should choose clothes that minimize the exposure of your skin the less skin you expose less likely mosquito gonna come to bite you so look for things like long sleeve shirts pants stuff like that the second thing to do with clothes is that you should use loose fitting clothes and the reason for that is because if you use loose fitting clothes.
Mr. B: You gonna prevent the mosquitoes from biting through it so you're going to be slightly more protected and finally some people recommend that you should use a light colored clothes because in theory this kind of clothing would attract mosquitoes less.
Jack: So the next measure is choosing the appropriate accommodation.
Mr. B: So in terms of accommodations I think the first thing you should look for is an accommodation that has an AC because if you turn on the AC you gonna prevent mosquitoes from coming around you since mosquitoes generally don't like cold and this is especially relevant when you go to sleep.
Mr. B: Workaround solution if the accommodation lacks an AC would be to get a fan and place it directly facing you thus the wind gonna be blowing directly into you because once again mosquitos don't like the strong wind and it would be slightly more protected the next thing to check in the accommodation is if there is mosquito nets for the bad alternatively if the accommodation does not provide this mosquito net you can bring your own since there are some very compact nets that you can carry in your luggage I have used a specific mosquito bed net so I'm gonna plug into show notes my recommendation two other things to watch out for in your accommodation are number one if there are any water pooling around accommodation anyplace with water is the ideal place for mosquitoes to breed so you want to empty any water from containers to prevent mosquitoes and finally look for an accommodation that have insect screens on the windows and if the accommodation does not have the insects screen try to keep the window close the majority of the time.
Jack: Yeah so the next measure is enhance your immune system.
Mr. B: So the immune system tips are very general of course it is applied to any disease but two important tips related to that are to use the relevance implementation to help your immune system and some health experts argue that zinc vitamin C. and vitamin D. are the three crucial ones you can also topped it off with a multivitamin and beyond that beyond the supplementation simply maintaining a good lifestyle which can be understood as sleeping enough drinking enough water having a balanced nutrition. This will of course also keep your immune system running smoothly.
Jack: Yes so the next measure is choose the environment and time of the day to go out.
Mr. B: So try to avoid places with a lot of vegetation a lot of you know trees forest stuff like that and or water lakes, rivers.
Mr. B: Stuff like that since these are the kind of places that tend to have more mosquitoes around also another thing to keep in mind is that the time of the day you go out matters a lot so generally if you go on from dusk until dawn tends to be the peak time for mosquitoes so perhaps not the best time to go out.
Jack: Yes so the next measure is prophylactic drugs.
Mr. B: So prophylactic drugs are these drugs that you can take in order to decrease the likelihood of contracting the disease and they are not available for the majority of mosquito borne diseases but for instance if we think about malaria there is a prophylactic drugs and these are things like doxycycline and chloroquine and to acquire such drugs you should of course consult with a doctor perhaps go to travel clinic in your country and explain to them look I'm going to this place as far as I understand there is the risk of this disease so I'd like to buy the prophylaxis for it another alternative some digital nomads prefer to go to the country first and try to get the drugs there because sometimes in countries afflicted by such diseases it is slightly easier to access such drugs.
Mr. B: One last thing is that you should keep in mind that for some of these drugs you need to start taking the medication before you go to the risk location.
Mr. B: Keep taking while you are there and then continue to take some time after it so it's not something like to get there you start taking as soon as you leave you stop you gotta do it for a longer period of time.
Jack: So the next measure is spray your clothing with insecticide.
Mr. B: So mosquito repellants are kind of the bread and butter of prevention against mosquito borne diseases but if you want to go a step further as you said you can spray your clothing with insecticide which is called a Permitherin so you got a spray this compound into your clothing let it dry and then you can wear your clothing as normal so the basic idea is that once you sprayed the substance this is going to repel or kill whatever mosquitoes come around the only thing to keep in mind is that you should never apply this substance Permitherin directly into your skin since that's harmful.
Jack: Yes I was just going to the next topic when you are considering living longer in the place that are infected by mosquito borne diseases what kind of thing you should consider.
Mr. B: Yeah that's a great question Jack and it seems to me that everyone can keep at least for some time all these good practices that we just talked about in terms of prevention and very likely if you follow the tips we just gave you won't contract any mosquito borne disease none the less some of this prevention practices will be hard to maintain for a longer period of time so let's imagine you say oh I really like Vietnam and I want to stay here three months and the reason why the maintaining some of this preventive measures might be difficult is because they might be taxing in your body if you apply them long term so here we can think about prophylactic drugs some people would argue that you shouldn't take those drugs for longer periods of time and another reason might be that it might simply be too annoying to take all this preventive measures for many months.
Mr. B: So assuming that if you decide to live for a couple of months let's say in that place afflicted by mosquito borne diseases than you won't be that diligent in terms of taking all this preventive measures it seems to me that there are some extra considerations that the digital nomad should make before deciding to move to this new location or not.
Jack: Yeah that makes sense so the first thing you wrote here is consider your overall health.
Mr. B: So when you're considering your overall health I would suggest you to pose yourself the two following questions do you have any underlying health condition and the second question is are you pregnant intending to be pregnant or breast feeding it seems to me that if you answer yes to any of such questions perhaps it would be better for you to avoid going to areas that are affected by a mosquito borne diseases and this is simply because the risks for you might be too great.
Jack: I see so the second consideration is the compromises you need to make.
Mr. B: So I think it's important again to consider the compromises that you might make and I would suggest you to ask yourself if you are OK having compromises in the name of safety.
Mr. B: So even if you do not follow all the preventive measures that we outline before you surely still gonna need to follow some of them if you are okay maintaining this compromises in terms of following preventive measures than it should be fine for you to stay longer in the place that is afflicted by mosquito borne disease.
Mr. B: Otherwise if you think that's a problem I would rethink relocating there to stay a longer period of time.
Jack: I see so the third consideration is how risk averse are you.
Mr. B: So of course people have very different risk tolerances some people are not okay with the risk of diseases even if that risk
Mr. B: Is pretty small so I would suggest you do ask yourself are you okay contemplating the possibility of catching one of such diseases.
Mr. B: If you are not okay then once again perhaps rethink going there because the longer you stay there the higher your chances of getting the disease.
Jack: So the four thing to consider is which time of year do you consider to live there.
Mr. B: There are some periods of the year that are of course more prone to mosquitoes for instance you could avoid going in the summer and rainy season since these are the periods within a year that most likely the place to be full of mosquitoes so if you avoid such times you probably going to be safer.
Jack: I see so the fifth thing to consider is which type of area you're gonna live when you are in the country.
Mr. B: So the rule of thumb here is the more urban and areas the last afflicted by mosquito borne diseases on the contrary countryside areas tend to be more afflicted by such diseases especially due to the environment and all full of trees and lakes so as we talked about before this type of environments tend to be suitable for mosquitoes just consider which kind of area you gonna live and perhaps choose more urban areas.
Jack: Yes so the sixth thing to consider is be attentive to your symptoms.
Mr. B: For most diseases the earlier you detect the better in terms of treatment of course we got to consider that as I said before some of these diseases have no specific treatment but I had some do so I would be very attentive to any symptom you might have and if you think you might have got the disease once again I would strongly suggest you to go to the hospital and get tested.
Jack: So the next thing to consider is to monitor the current pandemic situation of the place.
Mr. B: As we establish before the risk of mosquito borne disease in the country is not such a black and white matter it is definitely something that needs to be understood in terms of degrees of risk thus independent of let's say the baseline risk of the country you should always check if there are no major outbreaks happening at that very moment and the best way to check for that is to simply go to Google to put their name of the city or the country if there is any problem related to that disease at that very moment most likely there will be a news article talking about that of course if there is a major outbreak happening at that moment you should avoid the place.
Jack: I see so the next thing to consider is make sure you have insurance.
Mr. B: Health insurance is particularly relevant if you are going to a place that is afflicted by a mosquito borne diseases so make sure you have a health insurance and it gives you a good coverage so in case you contract any of the mosquito borne disease you won't need to worry about the spending related to your health.
Jack: Yes so the final thing to consider is the medical facilities of the city.
Mr. B: So checking if the city that you tend to live has the minimal required health related facilities I would say is very important again just in case you happen to contract mosquito borne disease you know you're going to have the basic infrastructure there for you.
Jack: Yes so I think this is the end of episode so Mr B. do you want to add anything to this?
Mr. B: I just would like to reenter a two things the first one is that once again we are not doctors so any of the information provided in this episode.
Mr. B: Is not intended or implied to substitute professional medical advice diagnosis or treatment and you should always you know double check with your doctor about anything related to mosquito borne diseases and the second thing is that again the intention is not to scare people off but it simply to you know provide you the information and you can travel more safely for instance when I go to certain parts of Southeast Asia I am you know worry free since the risks are almost nonexistent or very low and when I go to some more countryside areas I simply take some more precautionary measures so yeah I hope you found the episode useful.
Jack: I see also if you enjoyed this episode please make sure to leave a review on your listing platform and this is Jack and thanks for listening.
Mr. B: Thank you very much.

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